Little One at Brewery Theatre

Image by Graham Burke, with thanks

Image by Graham Burke, with thanks

This year, the students at Bristol Old Vic Theatre School showcase their work at Brewery Theatre with a series of plays by its four graduating directors. First up in these ‘Directors’ Cuts’ is Little One, directed by Laura McLean and written by Hannah Moscovitch.

Little One is the story of two adopted siblings, Aaron and Claire, brought together in a house in Ottawa by their two new well-meaning parents. Aaron is aware of his orphaned history; Claire might or might not remember hers. Aaron knows his given name; Claire represses hers.

A neglected or abused early life has left a legacy of instability in Claire, who must never be asked certain questions about her background, according to the ‘psyches’. Aaron is in charge of making sure she’s OK, being the older, less unhinged brother. And he seems to do his best – sacrificing some of the things he loves for ‘family unit time’ and generally doing the right thing by his little sister.

But, “She’s a monster,” he tells us almost from the off.

Kate Cavendish as Claire and Sam Woolf as Aaron address the audience alternately throughout the hour long production and Emily Russell’s lighting design is key here, illuminating each actor in turn, yet holding the other one there, within reach, often subdued but never obscured. What is interesting though is that, while Aaron recounts his life (obsession?) with his sister, she only talks about the neighbours, the Tech Guy and his mail-order Vietnamese bride, thus weaving us into the world of two families.

Cavendish displays versatility, switching from eager-to-please bouncy kid to throwing out her hauntingly worrying death stare. Woolf engages with authority so that we really want to find out how the whole thing ends!

A vital message of Little One is that nothing is exactly as it might seem; people are too complex for straight paths. At some point you feel sympathy with every character in the script, even, maybe especially, the ones we don’t meet (Roger, Kim-Li, Mum and Dad). I felt for Aaron in his protector guise and at times I wanted him to break and admit to his parents that he just couldn’t play this role anymore. Claire is unusual but, in her, I caught more than a glimpse of the pushing, questioning, stubborn, annoying, loving, insecure child that we have all known.

There is a dark humour in Moscovitch’s intelligent writing and other audience members laughed at the appropriate times, but I couldn’t even bring myself to snigger because the underlying subject matter is too painful and important. McLean’s direction has pulled all of the elements together, showing us that delicious promise and talent at BOVTS. Has it ever been any other way?

The Bristol Old Vic Theatre School Directors’ Cut Season 2015 runs at Brewery Theatre now and throughout May and is well worth your support!

Little One shows at Brewery Theatre until 2nd May

– Review by Becky Condron

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